Quote to Live By (“Simple” reasoning…)

Simplicity rarely loses to complexity in the battle of the public square.

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I often say that it is incredibly difficult to make something complex…seem simple. Never underestimate the value of a carefully considered and seemingly simple line of reasoning.

The art of asking the right questions

 A great definition I saw for questioning is that questioning enables us to organize our thinking around what we don’t know. So, in a time when so much knowledge is all around us, answers are at our fingertips, we really need great questions in order to be able to know what to do with all that information and find out way to the next answer.

I like the point of framing what you are putting your brain power towards by organizing it via the right questions.

Asking the Right Questions

The Cannonball Run…an American Race Like No Other

This wasn’t just a movie…

The Cannonball is the ultimate road trip, even as it jettisons the usual conventions of the road trip: There are no stops for photos, no detours to sample the World’s Greatest Pancakes, no putting the top down to shout along to the radio as the wind whips by. These trips are thrillingly tactical, planned down to the minute—built, for instance, around traffic light cycles in Manhattan and peak usage times at rural gas stations.

​This is such a fun article to read as it seems to satisfy that travel itch we all probably have right now and gives you a solid dose of nostalgic Americana at the same time.

It follows Fred Ashmore, a fairly obsessed and gifted driver, who recently attempted the time record…solo. Along the way, the author gives you the amazing history of how this race was created in the 1970’s by Brock Yates. A journalist if you can believe it.

Yates wanted to show that it was possible for Americans to drive safely at high speeds on the interstate, just as Germans did on the Autobahn.

The nonstop drive was a test run for an audacious plan that Yates had hatched: a multicar race across America that would prove, once and for all, that capable drivers in capable cars could cross the country faster and more safely than anyone imagined. Or, as Yates put it: “a balls-out, shoot-the-moon, fuck-the-establishment rumble from New York to Los Angeles.” The starting point of the race would be the Red Ball Garage, on East 31st Street in Manhattan, where Yates’s employer, Car and Driver magazine, kept a test fleet of cars. The destination, the Portofino Inn, in Redondo Beach, California, was owned by a friend of Yates’s.

​Highly recommend reading this if you, like me, have missed your regular travels over these past few months.

Inside the Frenzy to Conquer the Cannonball Run

The iPhone 12 Review Everyone Reads

Daring Fireball…

I try to keep two distinct readers in mind with these annual reviews of new iPhones. First, you, today — you probably want insight to help you decide, to some degree, whether you should upgrade from whatever iPhone you currently own (and you probably do own an iPhone already) to one of this year’s new ones, and if so, which one? Second, me, in the future — I want to look back and use what I write now as a resource to remember what was new with the 2020 iPhones.

As always…great review over at DF.

The iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro

Pennsylvania’s BEST Steelhead Fishing – Walnut Creek, Erie PA

Such a peaceful video shoot

I have been lucky to live in an absolutely gorgeous neighborhood…and fall kicks that beauty in to high gear.

My wife and I didn’t realize it when we decided to rent our house that there is a world class steelhead fishing spot just down the street.

Here it is.

Walnut Creek, Erie PA

John Muir on the Beauty of Fall

Muir reflects on the singular, counterintuitive life-affirmation of autumn:

In the yellow mist the rough angles melt on the rocks. Forms, lines, tints, reflections, sounds, all are softened, and although the dying time, it is also the color time, the time when faith in the steadfastness of Nature is surest… The seeds all have next summer in them, some of them thousands of summers, as the sequoia and cedar. In the holiday array all go calmly down into the white winter rejoicing, plainly hopeful, faithful… everything taking what comes, and looking forward to the future, as if piously saying, “Thy will be done in earth as in heaven!”

Amen. 🍁 🍁 🍁

John Muir on the Calm Assurance of Autumn as a Time of Renewal and Nature as a Tonic for Mental and Physical Health

Handwriting is the BEST

Then there’s memory. Print book readers retain more information.

As a new study from the Developmental Neuroscience Laboratory at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology argues, the same goes for writing. Handwriting helps children and adults remember information better. Typing is a shortcut.

The team, led by Professor Audrey van der Meer, hooked 250 nodes to each participant’s head to collect 500 data points per second. Once they were strapped in, a dozen 12-year-old children and a dozen young adults wrote by hand, typed, or drew. The clear winner: using paper, not devices.

This makes me happy.

Why?

Because while I do love my tech and productivity apps, there is just something about writing (journaling, note taking, etc) that cannot be matched.

Seems scientists agree.

Handwriting shown to be better for memory than typing, at any age

Typeface Matters

When done right, social responsibility gives back—to the charity and the business. And, as this research shows, something as simple as typeface choice matters.

Donors were one-sixth more likely to give when the typeface matched the message. In this case, that meant “warmth-focused” messages were handwritten while “competence-focused” initiatives were machine-written.

​Typeface has interested me for a couple years now. I might be embarrassed to tell you how much time I spent choosing the font for this site…and then tweaking it.

Seems like for some businesses it is time well spent.

Typeface matters: Donations go up depending on typeface choice