Links of the Week (4/20/2020)

Why they should read your article over others and a 103-year-old’s bucket list…

But why should readers choose your content over another writer’s work?

​This is one of those articles to save a re-read every now and then. Lots of valuable blogging specific advice here.

8 Transformative Edits to Strengthen Weak Content Writing – Copyblogger


The leading theory for why this happens is that the perception of time relies on the number of memories formed in a period, and memories are encoded from new and surprising experiences. The monotony of commuting to work on the same road for 20 years passes without leaving a mark. But every day is a memorable surprise to a child experiencing her first summer camp, or learning how big the universe is for the first time.

Time slowed in March because for the first time since childhood many of us are being bombarded with new and surprising experiences.

​I this this article answered a question I didn’t even know I had.

Why Time Has Slowed


  • Like everybody else, Romanian philosopher Mihai Sora is stuck inside.
  • He is keeping busy for a 103-year-old man, and keeping the world up to date on his indoor adventures with Facebook.
  • His to-do list is impressive, but not so impressive it can’t be used by most people.

​I’m impressed.

This 103-year-old philosopher’s to-do list will get you through self-isolation


While it’s very tempting to roll out of bed and into the workday still dressed in your most comfortable pajamas, this could be one of the biggest reasons you’re finding it hard to concentrate during your work from home days.

5 effortless, science-backed changes to your isolation workspace that will improve productivity and mental health

Links of the Week (4/14/2020)

Ever wonder what it would be like if you came back from isolation just to see the world in a pandemic?

When the world screeched to a halt, I didn’t notice. I was off the grid near Antarctica, lost in the cacophony of some 200,000 penguins. Elsewhere, highways were emptying, planes parking, and businesses shuttering as COVID-19 gained ground. But the order for social distancing hadn’t yet stretched to this corner of the planet.

I look away for one minute!!!!!

‘You are the only passenger’: How I returned to an empty world

Creativity, it is said, is intelligence having fun.

Never looked at it this way, but I’ve always heard that creative people (like comedians for example) are usually pretty smart.

Talent, you’re born with. Creativity, you can grow yourself.

Where is home for someone who travels full time?

Never thought of that.

Dirtbagging in the Time of COVID-19

I’m in the middle of my sophomore year at college, studying journalism. It’d my dream to someday work in climbing media. Do you have any advice for what I can do to make that dream a reality?

Ask an Editor: How Do You Get a Job in Climbing Media?

Links of the Week (3/30/2020)

How to shop healthy during a quarantine, coming back to a pandemic, and naps aren’t for everyone…

Whether you’re housebound for the next couple of weeks from a COVID-19 quarantine, or simply trying to survive a school or work shutdown, you’ll likely be limiting or avoiding trips to the grocery store.

So you may be wondering: What are the best foods to buy when you know you’re going to be stuck at home — and is it even possible to consume a nutritious diet?

Grocery rules for your coronavirus lockdown: Buy beans, freeze milk, don’t hoard, and more


25 days rafting through the Grand Canyon meant no access to the news — and a new reality when the trip ended.

This would be c-r-a-z-y.

Opinion | They Went Off the Grid. They Came Back to the Coronavirus.


The question of digital afterlife is being asked by Faheem Hussain, a clinical assistant professor in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society (SFIS) at Arizona State University. During a recent talk, “Our Digital Afterlife,” Hussain entertained questions that are hard to answer.

What happens to your social media when you die?


Naturally, I’ve always been a little jealous of the people who take naps and wake up feeling like a million bucks. I’m a healthy, youngish, childless woman who regularly sleeps seven to eight hours a night — why don’t naps work for me?

Naps are a 50/50 shot for me.

Naps don’t work for everyone. Genetic differences are why.

You Won’t Believe My Morning

Straight out of a futuristic Gulliver’s Travels…

I went out on my daily excursion to sit on the front step of my building for ten minutes holding my breath when people walked by. Normally, I spend the time diddling around my phone, but I forgot to bring my phone this morning, so I just looked around.

As I was taking in the emptiness of the street, a little glint caught my eye in a patch of dirt on the sidewalk. I bent over to look closer, and there was the glint again. It wasn’t a normal glint like from a shiny rock or a piece of metal—it was a little pinprick of flashing light.

Intrigued, I was now on all fours looking closer. And I saw the most surreal thing.

Tiny houses.

Like tiny houses. Each about a millimeter high, like ornately carved grains of sand.

I was either dreaming or looking at the coolest, cutest little art project ever.

As I examined the microscopic village, I noticed what looked like a scrawl of teeny letters on the dirt next to the houses. It said:

PUT YOUR THUMB ON THE OVAL

You HAVE to read this.